Repository logo
 

The effectiveness of the Vukuzakhe Programme in developing merging contractors: a case of KZN Department of Transport.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2019

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Publisher

Abstract

The era of racial segregation in South Africa resulted in numerous challenges that led to the skills deficiency and inadequacy of the black population, adversely affecting their participation in the country’ productive resources. This resulted in a number of black businesses not participating in the economic growth opportunities. As a result, the government created various initiatives to advance black businesses. This study assessed the effectiveness of the Vukuzakhe Emerging Contractor Development Programme (VECDP) in developing emerging contractors within the KwaZulu Natal Department of Transport (KZN DoT). The focus of the study was on contractors who participated in Vukuzakhe programme and that successfully achieved a CIDB Grade 3 grading after completion of the programme. A quantitative approach using purposive sampling method was used for the study. The study population was 110 contractors who were spread across KZN, out of which a sample of 86 of them participated in the survey. The questionnaire was designed using a Likert Scale and compared the performance of the participants on three key aspects; operational efficiencies, human resource management and financial management. The outcomes were assessed pre-vukuzakhe and post-vukuzahe programme. All of the 86 respondents completed the questionnaire, resulting in a completion and a participation rate of 100%. The data was extracted into Microsoft Excel and analysed using SPSS. On all the three aspects mentioned above,the results from the study showed that the abilities and skills of the participants improved greatly after the programme. The mean values of all factors under each key aspect by comparism were significantly different and higher after the programme. Thus, it was clear that the Vukuzakhe programme has been effective in developing emerging contractors. The researcher recommended that the success of the programme is phenomenal and that the DoT should continue administering this programme. It was further recommended by the reseacher that future studies should also be carried out, on other key aspects beyond the three areas that were covered in this study. As a limitation, the findings of this study is only applicable to the Vukuzakhe Programme and may not be extended to other emerging contractors development programme.

Description

Masters Degree. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban.

Keywords

Citation

DOI