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dc.contributor.advisorThomson, Elza.
dc.creatorLumka, Stewart.
dc.date.accessioned2011-01-31T12:36:56Z
dc.date.available2011-01-31T12:36:56Z
dc.date.created2003
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/2393
dc.descriptionThesis (MBA)-University of Natal, 2003.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this investigation, I assessed the underlying reasons for the revolution that succeeded a conventional merger proposal, which then degenerated into a hostile takeover bid. To my astonishment, I discovered that both banks were not diametrically opposed to an amalgamation. In fact, they both agreed on the strategic importance and business wisdom thereof. The fundamental differences arose from Standard's perception of Nedcor's deep-rooted arrogant intents, which were to gain its assets at bargain basement prices. These views were extended to Nedcor's principal Old Mutual as well, who were accused of harbouring sinister beliefs to actualise the obsessions of Nedcor's CEO, who sought to preside over the largest bank in the country, if not in the sub-continent. In the final analysis, a significant fortune and precious time were wasted in waging and defending a fruitless effort. This culminated in enriching the consultants and professional advisors, at the expense of both Standard and Nedcor shareholders, and their legitimate stakeholders alike. Conversely, it has since been acknowledged that this case study was a classical illustration of the potential pitfalls of hostile mergers and acquisitions. These lessons will undoubtedly enlighten other institutions and industry sectors that may be secretly entertaining similar desires.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectMergers and acquisitions.en_US
dc.subjectFinancial institutions.en_US
dc.subjectTheses--Business administration.en_US
dc.titleThe merger between two financial institutions.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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