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dc.creatorHilton, John L.
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-10T08:38:00Z
dc.date.available2012-12-10T08:38:00Z
dc.date.created2005
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationHilton, J.L. 2005. War and peace in the ancient Greek novel. Acta Classica 48, pp. 57-85.en
dc.identifier.issn0065-1141
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/8176
dc.description.abstractThis article investigates how war and peace are represented in Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, Chariton’s Chaereas and Callirhoe, the Ninus fragment, Achilles Tatius’ Leucippe, Longus’ Daphnis and Chloe, and Heliodorus’ Aithiopika. With the exception of the Cyropaedia and possibly the Aithiopika, these romances were composed at the height of the pax Romana when warfare between nations within the Roman Empire had declined. Nevertheless, war and battles constitute significant elements in these narratives, although they are often set in the remote past at the time of the Persian Empire and are frequently pastiches drawn from the historians. In Chariton, Achilles Tatius and Heliodorus, military episodes have an important narratological function. Attitudes to war vary: it is an intrusive element in the lives of most of the characters, and military bravado and imperial expansionism are sometimes viewed with irony. Occasionally the romances describe contemporary conflicts in considerable detail.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherClassical Association of South Africa.en
dc.subjectGreek fiction--History and criticism.en
dc.subjectWar in literature--Greece.en
dc.subjectWar and literature--Greece.en
dc.subjectPeace in literature--Greece.en
dc.subjectMilitary history, Ancient.en
dc.titleWar and peace in the ancient Greek novel.en
dc.typePeer reviewed journal articleen


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