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dc.contributor.advisorReddy, Vasu.
dc.creatorChetty, Parvathie.
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-18T07:37:52Z
dc.date.available2012-04-18T07:37:52Z
dc.date.created2007
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/5232
dc.descriptionThesis (LL.M.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, 2007.en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation focuses on how important factors such as gender inequalities and gender vulnerabilities contribute to fuelling the spread of HIV/AIDS. The study focuses on a community in Phoenix, called Clayfield. The study examines aspects of masculinity, sexual relations, socio-economic vulnerabilities and domestic violence and demonstrates how these elements predispose women and girls to HIV infection. As a result of gender inequalities and imbalances, women are vulnerable to HIV infection. The study also explores how risky behaviour, by both men and women, can escalate women's vulnerability to the disease. The central argument engages discussion on crucial issues around gender imbalances and vulnerabilities. The study concludes with recommendations pertinent to challenging present gender-based initiatives and interventions, and suggests possible gender-sensitive strategies that could assist in curbing the spread of the disease.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHIV/AIDS (Disease)--Durban Metropolitan Area--Phoenix.en
dc.subjectHIV infections--KwaZulu-Natal.en
dc.subjectHealth--Sex differences.en
dc.subjectTheses--Law.en
dc.titleGendered sexual vulnerabilities in the spread of HIV/AIDS : Clayfield (Phoenix) as case study.en
dc.typeThesisen


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