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dc.contributor.advisordu Toit, Juliette Leeb.
dc.creatorQuattrocchi, Isabella.
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-10T07:10:21Z
dc.date.available2011-11-10T07:10:21Z
dc.date.created2002
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/4146
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)-University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2002.en
dc.description.abstractThis study examines metaphoric expression as an innovative phenomenon in This study examines metaphoric expression as an innovative phenomenon in the creative process and explor.es theO!i_~s_~f_ metap~or as a model for changing our perceptions of reality. Innovation is taken to be the creation and extension of meaning via metaphoric reference and projection, an imaginative -----------"----------- ------_.--- -_. _~~- _~ ---- str~Lct~rimLOf ~~!i~f!~ !h,at !:.E!!l1v~nt~ealit and esents it as~ fiC!ion~ While fiction refers to those worlds made in the creative act of producing works of art, worlds refer to both the exterior manifestations of works, as well as the interior world as a source of symbolic worlds. This study thus explores metaphoric reference and projection as a means by which we understand and figuratively express experience and the role metaphor plays in the creative strategies of my own practice as a visual artist and those of the contemporary British artist Tony Cragg. In my own recent working practice, in relation to the innovative role of metaphor, the notion of psychic or metaphorical disruption is explored. This is understood as a suspension of logical or literal reference to reality and as the condition for a metaphoric or analogical response to experience. This form of disengagement brought about by psychological and emotional upheaval, allows me to disembark from dominant conceptual and emotional frameworks and corresponds to the semantic openings brought about by metaphoric reference and interpretation. These disruptions manifest themselves as primitive iconic conditions that provide routes in the creative process conducive to discovery, restructuring and invention. In my work this is principally achieved by the activity of drawing. I describe drawing as a mythic activity of attempting to close the gap on an elusive empirical world and as a means of making new worlds. Interpretation or reading the drawings, their surfaces and calligraphic marks, is' also part of the lyrical process of making ii fidions, metaphorical digressions and progressions towards deciphering and re-organising worlds. These worlds are both virtual and material spaces. In all the work, what appears to be disruptive or discordant brings about the condition for renewal and reorientation in the world. The \YOrk of Tony Cragg (b.1949) is discussed as an example of contemporary art pradice where metaphor is evident as a model for changing perceptions. Early in his career Cragg explored scientific models of investigation, as explanatory means for understanding the world. His work refleds an endeavour to 'humanise' these scientific models by making images that fundion as alternative and complementary 'thinking models' (Cragg in Celant :172). His working process is understood as an attempt to construct a novel referential scheme for our encounters with the physical \YOrld of objeds both natural and manufadured. His sculptures are thus interpreted as visual manifestations of metaphorical disruption and innovation. Often made from discarded waste, his sculptures emerge from the material ruin of a prior physical order, and an evolving mental order. In both instances, physically and conceptually, they carry traces of former selves, with the potential to .extend into something new. As a loose framevvork for this discussion, certain theories of mind and metaphor that provide some insights into my own \YOrking pradice and what I perceive to be those of Tony Cragg, are briefly examined. Principally, these include the theory of metaphor of the philosopher Paul Ricoeur, but also some more general views concerning cognition and imagination. These include the early theories of Giambattista Vico concerning the creative role of the imaginative and metaphorical capacities of the mind.. the creative process and explor.es theories of metaphor as a model for changing our perceptions of reality. Innovation is taken to be the creation and extension of meaning via metaphoric reference and projection, an imaginative -----------"----------- ------_.--- -_. _~~- _~ ---- str~Lct~rimLOf ~~!i~f!~ !h,at !:.E!!l1v~nt~ealit and esents it as~ fiC!ion~ While fiction refers to those worlds made in the creative act of producing works of art, worlds refer to both the exterior manifestations of works, as well as the interior world as a source of symbolic worlds. This study thus explores metaphoric reference and projection as a means by which we understand and figuratively express experience and the role metaphor plays in the creative strategies of my own practice as a visual artist and those of the contemporary British artist Tony Cragg. In my own recent working practice, in relation to the innovative role of metaphor, the notion of psychic or metaphorical disruption is explored. This is understood as a suspension of logical or literal reference to reality and as the condition for a metaphoric or analogical response to experience. This form of disengagement brought about by psychological and emotional upheaval, allows me to disembark from dominant conceptual and emotional frameworks and corresponds to the semantic openings brought about by metaphoric reference and interpretation. These disruptions manifest themselves as primitive iconic conditions that provide routes in the creative process conducive to discovery, restructuring and invention. In my work this is principally achieved by the activity of drawing. I describe drawing as a mythic activity of attempting to close the gap on an elusive empirical world and as a means of making new worlds. Interpretation or reading the drawings, their surfaces and calligraphic marks, is' also part of the lyrical process of making ii fidions, metaphorical digressions and progressions towards deciphering and re-organising worlds. These worlds are both virtual and material spaces. In all the work, what appears to be disruptive or discordant brings about the condition for renewal and reorientation in the world. The \YOrk of Tony Cragg (b.1949) is discussed as an example of contemporary art pradice where metaphor is evident as a model for changing perceptions. Early in his career Cragg explored scientific models of investigation, as explanatory means for understanding the world. His work refleds an endeavour to 'humanise' these scientific models by making images that fundion as alternative and complementary 'thinking models' (Cragg in Celant :172). His working process is understood as an attempt to construct a novel referential scheme for our encounters with the physical \YOrld of objeds both natural and manufadured. His sculptures are thus interpreted as visual manifestations of metaphorical disruption and innovation. Often made from discarded waste, his sculptures emerge from the material ruin of a prior physical order, and an evolving mental order. In both instances, physically and conceptually, they carry traces of former selves, with the potential to .extend into something new. As a loose framevvork for this discussion, certain theories of mind and metaphor that provide some insights into my own \YOrking pradice and what I perceive to be those of Tony Cragg, are briefly examined. Principally, these include the theory of metaphor of the philosopher Paul Ricoeur, but also some more general views concerning cognition and imagination. These include the early theories of Giambattista Vico concerning the creative role of the imaginative and metaphorical capacities of the mind.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectMetaphor.en
dc.subjectArt, Modern--20Th Century.en
dc.subjectCragg, Tony, 1949- --Criticism and interpretation.en
dc.subjectQuattrocchi, Isabella--Criticism and interpretation.en
dc.subjectRicoeur, Paul, 1913- --Criticism and interpretation.en
dc.subjectCreative ability.en
dc.subjectTheses--Fine art.en
dc.titleThe presence of metaphor in the work of selected contemporary artists.en
dc.typeThesisen


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