Show simple item record

dc.creatorCasale, Daniela Maria.
dc.creatorPosel, Dorrit.
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-14T13:22:07Z
dc.date.available2011-04-14T13:22:07Z
dc.date.created2010
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/2681
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1086/647976
dc.descriptionAccepted for publication to Economic Development and Cultural Change 58(2)January 2010. Article Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/647976en_ZA
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the nature of the male marital earnings premium in the context of a developing country in which the payment of bride wealth is practiced. We use data from the South African Labor Force Survey of September 2004 and the Labor Force Survey Panel (2001–4), the first national panel available in South Africa. We show that a robust and positive premium to marriage in cross‐sectional estimations is substantially reduced after controlling for individual fixed effects. Furthermore, we find evidence of an additional source of endogeneity created by the positive selection of men into marriage with faster earnings growth in the initial periods of the panel. Our results are to be expected if the payment of bride wealth or ilobolo, by a prospective husband to the bride’s family, is a significant constraint to marriage among black men in South Africa.en_ZA
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectMen, Black--South Africa.en_US
dc.subjectWages--Men, black--South Africa.en_US
dc.subjectBride price--South Africa.en_US
dc.subjectLabour Productivity--South Africa.en_US
dc.subjectLabour Market--South Africa.en_US
dc.subjectMarried men--South Africa.en_US
dc.titleThe Male Marital Earnings Premium in the Context of Bride Wealth Payments: Evidence from South Africa.
dc.typeJournal articleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record