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dc.contributor.advisorGous, Robert Mervyn.
dc.creatorNonis, Magalie Kathy.
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-04T12:43:11Z
dc.date.available2011-04-04T12:43:11Z
dc.date.created2007
dc.date.issued2007
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/2668
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2007.en_US
dc.description.abstractWith the worldwide increase in consumption of poultry meat in recent years, the production of hatchable eggs from broiler breeding stock has become a critically important component of the poultry industry. Surprisingly, a perusal of the literature pertaining to broiler breeder nutrition leads to the conclusion that research nutritionists have neglected these birds. It has been assumed in many cases that the research on laying hens is applicable to broiler breeders. However, fundamental differences are apparent between the two strains that should be investigated more comprehensively if the potential of broiler breeder hens is to be achieved. Commercial laying hens have been selected predominantly for increased egg production whereas broilers have been selected for early rapid growth rate. By selecting for improved growth rate, both food consumption and mature weight of these birds has increased (Reddy, 1996), but because of the negative genetic correlation between body weight and egg production (Robinson et al, 1993) reproductive performance has not been improved. Broiler breeder hens differ from commercial laying hens, by their non-normal frequency distribution of egg outputs, their considerable lipid reserves, and by the fact that many do not lay in closed cycle. The practice of restricting feed intake during both the rearing and laying periods has become a standard management procedure in commercial broiler breeder operations and this differs from the manner in which commercial hens are fed. This raises important issues regarding the requirements of these birds for energy, amino acids and other essential nutrients, as the birds do not have the opportunity of meeting their nutrient requirements by adjusting food intake upwards when one or more of these nutrients is deficient in the feed. It is the duty of the nutritionist to provide the correct daily allowance of each nutrient in order to achieve maximum egg output by the flock, but given the variation between hens within a flock, such decisions need to be made on both biological and economic grounds. Improved strains are continually being produced by breeder companies, which exhibit better growth, feed efficiency and productivity. The way in which broiler breeder hens were fed in the past might not be the most effective way to feed the latest strains. Getting the right amount of feed with the right nutrient levels at the right time is the most important part of feeding broiler breeders, and to succeed their daily nutrient requirements need to be known. Information concerning the nutritional requirements of broiler breeder hens is limited in comparison to other types of domesticated poultry. However, enough information is available concerning energy and amino acid nutrition of this type of poultry to enable one to develop models useful for constructing accurate feeding programmes. The most appropriate way of estimating the nutrient requirement of broiler breeder hens during the laying period, or of optimising a feeding strategy, is by the use of simulation models. Emmans and Fisher (1986) suggested that a better approach to the problem of describing requirements and of expressing them quantitatively can be achieved by considering: firstly, the bird’s characteristics, secondly by defining resource scales carefully and thirdly by considering the quantities of each resource needed per unit of function. This approach has a greater chance of success than attempting to measure requirements by direct experimentation. Energy and amino acids are required for growth of tissues, egg production, maintaining normal body temperature, vital life functions and activity. For development of feeding programmes, we are most concerned with the three primary components, maintenance, growth and egg output. There are a number of factors that impact on the total nutrient requirement of the breeder. The maintenance component is affected by body size, environmental temperature, level of activity (housed in floor pens vs. cages) and possibly breed. Regarding the growth component, in the case of broiler breeders during lay the composition of growth needs to be addressed: whether this is only lipid gain or also includes protein gain. Lastly, the egg component is influenced by egg mass and hen age. In order to calculate energy and amino acid requirements, one must have knowledge of the requirements per unit of body protein weight, growth rate and egg mass. By continually monitoring the environmental conditions in the broiler breeder house, as well as body weight, egg weight and egg number, it is possible to estimate the state of the hens at any time and hence the optimum nutrient concentrations that should be fed the next day of the laying period by using the Breeder Model presented in this thesis. Optimising the feeding of broiler breeders during the laying period is made difficult because of the many interacting factors influencing their performance All the hens are not the same, they are not housed in the same environments, and the costs of feeding and the revenue derived from the sale of the product differs from one locality to another. The solution to this problem lies in the use of simulation models to describe the causal relationship between inputs and the predicted responses. This thesis explored new concepts and components for a simulation model to predict the nutrient requirement and performance of broiler breeders after sexual maturity.en_US
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_US
dc.subjectBroilers (Poultry)--Feeding and feeds.en_US
dc.subjectBroilers (Poultry)--Nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectPoultry--Feeding and feeds.en_US
dc.subjectPoultry--Feed utilization efficiency.en_US
dc.subjectEggs--Production.en_US
dc.subjectPoultry--Mathematical models.en_US
dc.subjectEggs--Mathematical models.en_US
dc.subjectTheses--Animal and poultry science.en_US
dc.titleModelling nutrient responses and performance of broiler breeders after sexual maturity.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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