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dc.contributor.advisorLasich, A. L.
dc.contributor.advisorNaidoo, L. R.
dc.creatorMansoor, Fathima Bibi.
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-07T07:54:08Z
dc.date.available2011-02-07T07:54:08Z
dc.date.created2006
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/2538
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Med.)-University of Natal, Durban, 1986.en_US
dc.description.abstractCross cultural research on the association between Life Events, Social Support, Religious Affinity, and Depression is limited. In view of the clinical impression that depression is becoming more prevalent in the Indian South African population, a community which is culturally distinct from Anglo-American populations, and the fact that there are no studies on these three variables in the Indian population, a study was planned to investigate the association between Life Events, Social Support, Religious Affinity, and Depression in the Indian South African population. The research design involved the analysis of data on Life Events, Social Support, and Religious Affinity. This data was obtained from a sample of 15 female depressives (which formed the Experimental group) and 15 matched community controls (henceforth designated the Control group). Informed consent was obtained from both sample groups prior to participation in the study. A 50 item Social Readjustment Rating Questionnaire - Chohanls Adaptation (SRRQ-CA), a 4 item Social Support Scale, and a 4 item Religious Affinity Scale was administered to both groups to assess Life Events, Social Support, and Religious Affinity respectively. A t-Test analysis of the scores obtained produced the following major findings: 1. The Experimental group experienced a significantly higher degree of life stress than the Control group. 2. The Experimental group experienced a significantly greater number of life events than the Control group. 3. The Experimental group experienced lower social support than the Control group. This result was not statistically significant. 4. The Experimental group reported less religious affinity than the Control group. This result was not statistically significant. These findings lend themselves to further research in this field and have significant therapeutic implications.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectDepression, Mental--South Africa.en_US
dc.subjectIndians--South Africa--Mental health.en_US
dc.subjectTheses--Psychiatry.en_US
dc.titleA controlled study of life events, social support, and religious affinity among depressed Indian South Africans.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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