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dc.creatorAbdool Karim, Salim Safurdeen.
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-17T07:28:42Z
dc.date.available2010-11-17T07:28:42Z
dc.date.created1990
dc.date.issued1990
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/1791
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Med.)-University of Natal, 1990.en_US
dc.description.abstractRoutinely collected data on vaccines supplied and administered, measles notifications and hospital admissions for measles were used to evaluate the 1990 measles immunisation campaign in Natal/KwaZulu. comparisons of the monthly averages during the 12 month period before the campaign, 4 months of the campaign and 12 months after the campaign indicated that the 1990 measles campaign in Natal/KwaZulu demonstrated that the campaign was limited, not by design, to blacks only. The campaign galvanised a high degree of participation from almost all health services in this region and resulted in a rapid and marked plunge in the incidence of measles as reflected by declines in both measles notifications and measles hospital admissions. There was no deleterious shortterm residual effect of the measles campaign on routine measles immunisation services. The spillover effects of the measles campaign on routine immunisation services against polio, tuberculosis and tetanus was generally beneficial. While the campaign was a success in generating involvement of health services in Natal/KwaZulu and reducing the burden of measles in this region, this disease has not been eliminated. Vigilance and continued routine vaccination efforts are required to prevent further epidemics of measles in Natal/KwaZulu.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectMeasles--Vaccination--KwaZulu-Natal.en_US
dc.subjectTheses--Public health medicine.en_US
dc.titleEvaluation of a measles immunisation campaign in Natal/KwaZulu.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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