Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorRuffin, Fayth Anese.
dc.contributor.advisorMutereko, Sybert.
dc.creatorMkhize, Jerome Thokozani.
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-01T08:25:58Z
dc.date.available2020-04-01T08:25:58Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://researchspace.ukzn.ac.za/handle/10413/17353
dc.descriptionMasters Degree. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe public sector organizations have the mandate to ameliorate poverty by not only through the provision of social assistance but develop the community for self-reliance and sustainable economic participation. Previous studies have provided that Differently abled people (DAP) have, and are continuing to be marginalised. Barnes and Mercer, (2008), Marumongae (2012) confirm that the majority of DAP can live independent and productive lives provided they are offered opportunities, resources, adequate environment, dignity and technical aids that allow them to display their potential. Barclay L.A., Markel K.S, and Yugo J.E. (2012) also argue that stigmatization interferes negatively with the integration of DAP into the work environment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the organizational inclusion in the employment of DAP with reference to the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN). The mixed method used a combination of both the quantitative and qualitative methods to obtain answers to questions posed by the study. The quantitative research method was used whereby questionnaires were circulated to SASSA employees. Fifty-six respondents returned the completed questionnaires. Some of the questionnaires had additional statements providing more information for the study. Data collected through questionnaires were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Services version 24. Five participants provided their responses during the in-depth face to face interviews. These interviews were conducted to obtain their understanding about the employment of DAP and to gather information on their perceptions about the employment of DAP. Findings from the survey revealed that 64.3% of respondents agreed that SASSA-KZN has adequate policies influencing the employment of DAP. Only 14.7% disagreed. Statements from some participants indicated that they are not aware of the policies that are in place to accommodate DAP. The findings on interviews indicated a minimal diversion where respondents during interviews showed that they were not aware that SASSA-KZN has adequate policies on the employment of DAP this means that education on policies is essential. However, perceptions of SASSA employees are that there should be systems developed to accommodate DAP and they do not have a problem with working with DAP. Findings on the second objective to establish the perceptions of KZN SASSA managers about the that DAP need more time off for medical appointments, they have to be closely monitored and that there are cost implications because of infrastructure improvements. Findings on the third objective aiming to determine how KZN SASSA employees perceive the implementation of the Employment Equity Act 55 of 1998 with regards to the employment of DAP, survey and interviews agree on the employment of DAP which is a conversion on employee perceptions. Findings on the fourth objective show a conversion on the findings since both the survey and interviews findings reveal that there is no adequate infrastructure and no procurement plans in place to accommodate DAP. The findings have major implications for the employment of DAP by SASSA-KZN. For management and Human Capital management practitioners, the study has the following implications: It may assist them to learn and interpret and consistently communicate all policies to employees across the board since the current finding is that not all employees are aware of the policies on the employment of DAP. Policy makers within SASSA-KZN may learn to ensure that policies and guidelines are implemented effectively to inculcate positive attitudes and perceptions among all employees. This will also assist in closing gaps where employees feel that policies are inactive. The aim of this chapter was to provide a summary of the study, make recommendations and to outline the implications of the study. It has shown that the management of the employment of DAP is poor and not in line with the true sense of transformation. The study has further shown that the environment within SASSA-KZN is not yet adequate to accommodate DAP. The positive side of the findings is that SASSA-KZN does have policies on employing and supporting DAP but on the negative side they are not adequately communicated and properly implemented for effectiveness. Recommendations were that SASSA KZN develops clear systems to accommodate the employment of DAP. It further recommended that adequate infrastructure should be provided in future in order to accommodate the needs of DAP even when the policies of employing them are clear and adequately implemented, employment of DAP showed diversion between survey and interviews on whether it is gainful to employ DAP. Survey findings indicated that it is gainful and on the contrary, interviews indicated that DAP need more time off for medical appointments, they have to be closely monitored and that there are cost implications because of infrastructure improvements. Findings on the third objective aiming to determine how KZN SASSA employees perceive the implementation of the Employment Equity Act 55 of 1998 with regards to the employment of DAP, survey and interviews agree on the employment of DAP which is a conversion on employee perceptions. Findings on the fourth objective show a conversion on the findings since both the survey and interviews findings reveal that there is no adequate infrastructure and no procurement plans in place to accommodate DAP. The findings have major implications for the employment of DAP by SASSA-KZN. For management and Human Capital management practitioners, the study has the following implications: It may assist them to learn and interpret and consistently communicate all policies to employees across the board since the current finding is that not all employees are aware of the policies on the employment of DAP. Policy makers within SASSA-KZN may learn to ensure that policies and guidelines are implemented effectively to inculcate positive attitudes and perceptions among all employees. This will also assist in closing gaps where employees feel that policies are inactive. The aim of this chapter was to provide a summary of the study, make recommendations and to outline the implications of the study. It has shown that the management of the employment of DAP is poor and not in line with the true sense of transformation. The study has further shown that the environment within SASSA-KZN is not yet adequate to accommodate DAP. The positive side of the findings is that SASSA-KZN does have policies on employing and supporting DAP but on the negative side they are not adequately communicated and properly implemented for effectiveness. Recommendations were that SASSA KZN develops clear systems to accommodate the employment of DAP. It further recommended that adequate infrastructure should be provided in future in order to accommodate the needs of DAP even when the policies of employing them are clear and adequately implemented.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subject.otherDifferently abled people.en_US
dc.subject.otherOrganizational inclusion.en_US
dc.subject.otherSouth African Social Security Agency.en_US
dc.subject.otherEmployment Equity Act.en_US
dc.subject.otherEmploying people with disabilities.en_US
dc.titleThe assessment of organizational inclusion in the employment of differently abled people (DAP): a case study of the South African Social Security Agency in KwaZulu Natal.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record