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dc.contributor.advisorSubramanien, Darren Cavell.
dc.contributor.advisorBadul, Chantal.
dc.creatorSobantu, Vuyo.
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-05T12:35:21Z
dc.date.available2019-11-05T12:35:21Z
dc.date.created2018
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttps://researchspace.ukzn.ac.za/handle/10413/16524
dc.descriptionMaster of Laws in Business Law. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2018.en_US
dc.description.abstractCompanies are constantly facing risks, including financial constraints, which may contribute to companies being unable to trade in the manner desired. Unfortunately, companies that find themselves in this predicament have, in reality, been without a remedy from as early as statutory provisions regulating company law were promulgated in 1926. Judicial management, as a remedy, is notorious for being an outright failure, but the current Companies Act 71 of 2008 introduced the remedy of business rescue for financially distressed companies. The scrutiny and spotlight on the new remedy turns on whether it can be truly accessible for the companies in question and what significant changes it has made to favour financially distressed companies. This mini dissertation will aim to discuss whether the remedy of business rescue has been a success or failure.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subject.otherBusiness rescue.en_US
dc.subject.otherAiling companies.en_US
dc.subject.otherWinding up.en_US
dc.subject.otherCompanies Act 71 of 2008.en_US
dc.subject.otherJudicial management.en_US
dc.subject.otherCompanies Act 61 of 1973.en_US
dc.subject.otherSouth African company law.en_US
dc.titleA discussion of the success and failures of business rescue as a remedy for ailing companies.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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