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dc.contributor.advisorCollings, Steven John.
dc.creatorHunter, John.
dc.date.accessioned2018-05-02T13:45:45Z
dc.date.available2018-05-02T13:45:45Z
dc.date.created2017
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/15188
dc.descriptionDoctor of Philosophy in Psychology. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 2017.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis analyses the structure, conditions, promises, and results of Large Group Awareness Trainings (LGATs)³, demonstrating that established environmental triggers for hypomania/mania are core features of the LGAT process, and that the majority of (ostensibly healthy) LGAT participants display symptoms that closely resemble hypomania/mania. Through an understanding of the biology of stress (the common element in identified environmental triggers for hypomania/mania), and with reference to the dopamine hypothesis of bipolar disorder, the 1911 manic-defence hypothesis is revisited, and an allostatic⁴, rather than solely psychoanalytic, mechanism by which the structured application of psychological stress leads to hypomania/mania is hypothesised.en_US
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_US
dc.subject.otherHypomania.en_US
dc.subject.otherStress-induced hypomania.en_US
dc.subject.otherPsychology.en_US
dc.subject.otherBipolar.en_US
dc.titleStress-induced hypomania in healthy participants : the allostatic “manic-defence hypothesis”.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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