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dc.contributor.advisorVan Staden, Johannes.
dc.creatorWilson, Philip John.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-26T08:29:17Z
dc.date.available2014-03-26T08:29:17Z
dc.date.created1988
dc.date.issued1988
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/10520
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)-University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 1988.en
dc.description.abstractAdventitious rooting in stem cuttings of Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maid. was thought to be influenced by a putative inhibitor. In previous studies it has been usual to infer the presence of putative rooting inhibitors and promoters from the mung bean bioassay, but the possibility was raised that treatment responses in this assay could be mediated more by the concentration of the treatment solution than by the chemical identity of the solute. This appeared to be so: several solutes, including hydrochloric acid and common salt, were found to promote the rooting of mung bean cuttings when present in the treatment solution at an apparently injurous concentration. The concept of promoters and inhibitors of adventitious rooting, as constituted at present, was considered to be an unfavourable approach for further studies. Stem cuttings must contain a morphogen, broadly defined, which operates the 'switch' from stem to adventitious root. The leaves and buds of E.grandis stem cuttings did not appear to be sole sources of a morphogen (as is often assumed), but nevertheless the activity of the leaves and buds was good for rooting. This activity was reflected in the pattern of root emergence. A slight preponderance emerged from the leaf trace sectors of the stem, suggesting that the leaves and buds cause a morphogen (of unknown origin) to circulate in the cutting. The existence of a vascular morphogen was confirmed and it proved to be very mobile in the stem, suggesting that it is well distributed circumferentially at the base of the cutting rather than confined to the leaf trace sectors. It appeared to be super-abundant at the base of easy-to-root cuttings, but it was not possible to tell to what extent the morphogen was rendered accessible to the sites where roots initiate. In general, the rate of efflux from the transporting tissues, the rate of attenuation of the morphogen after efflux, and the number of potential sites for root initiation must interact on a small scale to determine rooting ability. The relative prominence of these groups of factors would be expected to vary with circumstances, for example at different locations within a single stem cutting, so the traditional concept of a limiting morphogen ('rhizocaline') is unhelpful in its simplest form. Nevertheless, the rhizocaline concept provides a starting point towards a more comprehensive view of adventitious rooting, which is required in order to predict and improve rooting ability. This view remains a remote objective because many of the factors which could be important have recieved very little attention and will be difficult to elucidate.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectEucalyptus--Propagation.en
dc.subjectTheses--Botany.en
dc.titleAdventitious rooting in stem cuttings of Eucalyptus grandis Hill ex Maid.en
dc.typeThesisen


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