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dc.contributor.advisorTapamo, Jules-Raymond.
dc.contributor.advisorMcDonald, A. M.
dc.creatorNaidoo, Tyrone.
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-02T06:39:42Z
dc.date.available2017-03-02T06:39:42Z
dc.date.created2016
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/14171
dc.descriptionMaster of Science in Computer Engineering. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 2016.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, there has been a rapid increase in Internet usage, which has in turn led to a rise in malicious network activity. Network Intrusion Detection Systems (NIDS) are tools that monitor network traffic with the purpose of rapidly and accurately detecting malicious activity. These systems provide a time window for responding to emerging threats and attacks aimed at exploiting vulnerabilities that arise from issues such as misconfigured firewalls and outdated software. Anomaly-based network intrusion detection systems construct a profile of legitimate or normal traffic patterns using machine learning techniques, and monitor network traffic for deviations from the profile, which are subsequently classified as threats or intrusions. Due to the richness of information contained in network traffic, it is possible to define large feature vectors from network packets. This often leads to redundant or irrelevant features being used in network intrusion detection systems, which typically reduces the detection performance of the system. The purpose of feature selection is to remove unnecessary or redundant features in a feature space, thereby improving the performance of learning algorithms and as a result the classification accuracy. Previous approaches have performed feature selection via optimization techniques, using the classification accuracy of the NIDS on a subset of the data as an objective function. While this approach has been shown to improve the performance of the system, it is unrealistic to assume that labelled training data is available in operational networks, which precludes the use of classification accuracy as an objective function in a practical system. This research proposes a method for feature selection in network intrusion detection that does not require any access to labelled data. The algorithm uses normalized cluster validity indices as an objective function that is optimized over the search space of candidate feature subsets via a genetic algorithm. Feature subsets produced by the algorithm are shown to improve the classification performance of an anomaly{based network intrusion detection system over the NSL-KDD dataset. Despite not requiring access to labelled data, the classification performance of the proposed system approaches that of efective feature subsets that were derived using labelled training data.en_US
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_US
dc.subjectAnomaly detection (Computer security)en_US
dc.subjectIntrusion detection systems (Computer security)en_US
dc.subjectFirewalls (Computer security)en_US
dc.subjectComputer networks.en_US
dc.subjectTheses -- Computer engineering.en_US
dc.subjectNetwork Intrusion Detection Systems (NIDS).en_US
dc.titleUnsupervised feature selection for anomaly-based network intrusion detection using cluster validity indices.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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