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dc.contributor.advisorMeiring, Pierre Andre.
dc.creatorTaylor, Andrew Bruce.
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-16T12:02:12Z
dc.date.available2013-09-16T12:02:12Z
dc.date.created1989
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/9572
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)-University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 1989.en
dc.description.abstractSouth Africa produces alternative fuels from a number of different sources. The properties of a fuel are known to affect the nature of combustion in compression-ignition engines significantly, and have occasionally resulted in engine failures. Combustion analyses have been conducted on a wide range of fuels and combustion has been thoroughly quantified. However, the role played by the different combustion variables in failures was not known. The result was that it was not possible to predict the implications of variations in the nature of combustion. There was thus a need to investigate the relative role of combustion variables in the failure of engines. The mechanisms of combustion and engine failure were studied. All the variables required to determine combustion and engine durability were measured simultaneously. This research required the development of a complete engine research facility as well as specialized transducers. Fast response surface thermocouples were designed and constructed in order to monitor transient surface temperatures. Heat transfer rates were then calculated with the aid of Fourier analysis. Dynamic stresses were monitored by strain-gauges applied to the engine. A special high speed data acquisition system was developed. An existing heat release model was modified and used to calculate combustion rates. A comprehensive finite element model was developed to calculate piston temperatures and stresses. The role of each combustion variable in stress and durability was investigated by statistical analysis. The results successfully identified the causes of combustion related engine failures. The primary cause of engine failure was found to be thermal loading. The principal cause of any variation in thermal loading and thus engine durability was maximum cylinder pressure. The life of the engine was proved to be determined almost entirely by peak cylinder pressure. The role of the rate of pressure rise was proved to be insignificant. All the implications of variations in the nature of combustion can now be determined accurately. It will thus be possible to optimise engine modifications and fuel properties before validation by durability testing.en
dc.language.isoen_ZAen
dc.subjectDiesel motor--Combustion.en
dc.subjectDiesel motor--Alternate fuels.en
dc.subjectTheses--Agricultural engineering.en
dc.titleCombustion stress in compression-ignition engines.en
dc.typeThesisen


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