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dc.creatorMarais, Debra Leigh.
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-27T12:30:16Z
dc.date.available2010-08-27T12:30:16Z
dc.date.created2006
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/698
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) - University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2006.en_US
dc.description.abstractInformed consent procedures are an essential part of the ethical conduct of research, including clinical trials. The principle of autonomy justifies this process. However, it is clear that conventional assumptions about autonomy offer limited guidance in many countries where clinical research on non-Western populations is conducted by Western researchers. Beginning with a brief review of conventional approaches to autonomy, the present research explored feminist alternatives to this principle, drawn from self-in-relation and care theories.
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectBioethics.en_US
dc.subjectFeminist ethics.en_US
dc.subjectFeminism.en_US
dc.subjectAutonomy.en_US
dc.subjectPublic health--Moral and ethical aspects.en_US
dc.subjectEthics.en_US
dc.subjectIdentity (Philosophical concept)en_US
dc.subjectMedical ethics.en_US
dc.subjectTheses--Psychology.en_US
dc.title(Re)constructing the autonomous self : an empirical feminist inquiry into gender and the autonomy ideal.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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