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dc.creatorCollins, V. A.
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-18T11:57:19Z
dc.date.available2012-04-18T11:57:19Z
dc.date.created2003
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/5242
dc.descriptionThesis (LL.M.)-University of Natal, Durban, 2003.en
dc.description.abstractConsider this: South Africa recently became the first country in the world to commercially release genetically engineered maize for human consumption. In contrast to the cautionary approach adopted by other African countries, South Africa has one of the fastest growth rates in genetically engineered crop cultivation worldwide, almost doubling the number of hectares of the country now planted with genetically engineered crops since 2001. Owing to the genetic engineering revolution in our food, it is no wonder that people are becoming more concerned about the food on their plates than ever before. It is essential that people consuming genetically engineered food become aware of who is benefiting and who is not benefiting from the biotechnological industry, by understanding the risks to health, the environment and the economy. If the food that consumers purchase is genetically engineered, consumers should have the right to know and make that choice to either purchase or avoid genetically engineered food. This topic is pertinent in South Africa, as the government has clearly decided that genetically engineered food is part of our future and, to date, the labelling of GE food is not mandatory.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectGenetic engineering--Law and legislation.en
dc.subjectPlant genetic engineering.en
dc.subjectTheses--Law.en
dc.subjectGenetic engineering.en
dc.titleGeo : food for thought.en
dc.typeThesisen


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