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dc.contributor.advisorPerrin, Michael R.
dc.creatorFielden, Laura Jane.
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-03T13:07:00Z
dc.date.available2014-07-03T13:07:00Z
dc.date.created1989
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/11026
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)-University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 1989.en
dc.description.abstractEremitalpa granti namibensis is a small blind subterranean insectivore (Chrysochloridae) endemic to the Namib Desert sand dunes. This study of the biology and ecology of the Namib mole assesses its adaptive strategies for survival in a harsh environment. Major areas of study include feeding ecology, movement patterns, home range, activity, thermoregulation and water metabolism. Diet of free-living moles was assessed through stomach content analysis while qualitative and quantitative descriptions of surface foraging paths related searching behaviour to resource abundance and distribution. Moles opportunistically fed on termites, a sedentary prey resource occurring in patches of high concentrations while non-random surface locomotion minimised foraging costs. Population density and home range utilisation were studied by following surface trails and capture mark and recapture. Population density was low but stable and home range size large. No permanent nests or burrows were found while the pattern of home range utilisation was nomadic but circumscribed. Although ranges overlapped, a system of mutual avoidance limited encounters with neighbouring animals. Activity phasing was examined in the field and in the laboratory. Free-living moles were almost exclusively nocturnal while captive moles were active day and night. These findings are discussed in relation to prey availability, predator pressure and avoidance of diurnal extremes. Light and temperature appeared to be important cues for daily onset and cessation of activity. Aspects of thermoregulation examined under laboratory and field conditions revealed high thermal conductance, a low basal metabolic rate and poor thermoregulatory abilities. Factors suggested to have selected for these traits are the gaseous regime of the sand in which moles burrow and the need to minimise energy expenditure in an energy sparse environment. Laboratory and field studies employing isotopic dilution of energy and water methods e xamined the metabolism ability of moles to survive on an insect diet without drinking water. Water independence was achieved through efficient renal function while low rates of energy usage and torpor were further effective in reducing overall water requirements. In summation, a broad overview of adaptive radiation in Namib moles compared to other subterranean mammals is discussed.en
dc.language.isoen_ZAen
dc.subjectMoles (Animals)--Ecology.en
dc.subjectInsectivora--Namibia--Namib Desert.en
dc.subjectEremitalpa granti Namibensis.en
dc.subjectTheses--Zoology.en
dc.titleSelected aspects of the adaptive biology and ecology of the Namib Desert golden mole (Eremitalpa granti Namibensis)en
dc.typeThesisen


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