Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorVan Staden, Johannes.
dc.creatorBayley, Arlene Diane.
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-19T12:40:44Z
dc.date.available2014-03-19T12:40:44Z
dc.date.created1989
dc.date.issued1989
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/10506
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)-University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 1989.en
dc.description.abstractHypoxoside, a phenolic diglucoside, with a diarylpentane-type structure, is thought to be the medicinally active constituent of corm extracts of Hypoxis hemerocallidea Fisch. & Mey. which are reputed to alleviate the symptoms of prostate hypertrophy and urinary infections. The biosynthes is and production of this unique phytochemical were investigated in H. hemerocallidea using both in vivo and in vitro systems. It was found, in root-producing callus, that [l4]C-phenylalanine and [14]C-t-cinnamic acid were efficient precursors for hypoxoside in comparison to [14]C-sodium acetate and [14]C-acetyl coenzyme-A, which were not incorporated into the phenolic compound. Thus, at least one aryl moiety of hypoxoside was derived, via phenylalanine and t-cinnamic acid, from the shikimate pathway. The acetate pathway did not appear to be involved in the biosynthetic process. The data supports the hypothesis that the molecule is formed from two cinnamate units with the loss of a carbon atom, in opposition to the proposal that the molecule is derived from head-to-tail condensation of acetate units onto a propenylic moiety. Despite the structural similarities between hypoxoside and caffeic and p-coumaric acids, these two hydroxycinnamic acids were not efficient precursors for hypoxoside in vivo or in vitro. A number of reasons are put forward to explain this finding. It was found that the greatest concentration of hypoxoside was located in the corms of intact plants. The major biosynthetic site of the molecule was also found to be located in this organ. Since the roots did accumulate the phytochemical to a small extent, the biosynthetic potential of these organs has not been disregarded. That of the leaves has been, however. The report by PAGE (1984) that the upper region of the corm contained a greater con cent ration of hypoxoside than the lower portion, is substantiated in this study, where this region was found to be more biosynthetically active than the lower half. Light microscopic and electron microscopic studies revealed that starch storing cells, which accumulated phenolics in their vacuoles, contained seemingly synthetically active tubular endoplasmic reticulum in their cytoplasm. A greater number of these cells were concentrated in the upper region as opposed to the lower half of the corm. It is postulated that these cells are the site for biosynthesis and accumulation of hypoxoside. The shikimate pathway, from which the precursors for hypoxoside are derived, was found, through the exposure of intact plants to [14]C-carbon dioxide, to be located mainly in the leaves. It is postulated from the above study and one in which [14]C-phenylalanine, [14]C-t-cinnamic acid, [14]C-p-coumaric acid and [14]C-caffeic acid were applied to intact plants, that phenylalanine and/or cinnamic acid are the transported form of the shi kimate derivatives. p-Coumaric and caffeic acids, which are metabolically more stable, are envisaged to be the sequestering forms. The investigation of the seasonal production of hypoxoside revealed that most of the synthesis and accumulation occurred after the corms had broken winter dormancy and after the flush of leaf growth had slowed down. During dormancy the production of hypoxoside appeared to cease. The in vjtro studies, where the effects of light, temperature, nutrients, plant growth regulators and supply of potential precursors, on hypoxoside production by root-producing callus were investigated, indicate that this metabolite is not simply a "shunt" metabolite. A number of factors other than precursor availability enhanced, or reduced the jn vjtro production of this phytochemical. Furthermore, production of the phytochemical and growth were not always antagonistic. Hypoxoside, the biosynthesis of which requires a more thorough investigation, is, however, according to this investigation, a typical secondary metabolite in many respects.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBiosynthesis.en
dc.subjectPlant tissue culture.en
dc.subjectHypoxis hemerocallidea.en
dc.subjectMetabolism, Secondary.en
dc.subjectHypoxoside.en
dc.subjectTheses--Botany.en
dc.titleThe biosynthesis and production of hypoxoside in Hypoxis hemerocallidea Fisch. and Mey. in vivo and in vitro.en
dc.typeThesisen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record