Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorMkhize, Nhlanhla J.
dc.contributor.advisorButhelezi, N. P. A.
dc.creatorAdewusi, Kikelomo Adebukola.
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-27T09:36:25Z
dc.date.available2012-03-27T09:36:25Z
dc.date.created2011
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/5161
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Soc.Sc.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, 2011.
dc.description.abstractA sample of five hundred and three (503) University of KwaZulu-Natal students participated in this study, which investigated Black Nigerian and South African tertiary students' estimates of theirs and their relatives' multiple and overall intelligences. Participants‟ ages ranged from 18-44 years. The sample included both undergraduate and postgraduate students. The aim of the study was to investigate black students‟ perceptions of theirs and their relatives' multiple intelligences, using the theory of multiple intelligences developed by Gardner (1983). Participants were asked to rate their own overall estimates of intelligence as well as their relatives. Results show significant differences in nationalities with Nigerians rating themselves and their relatives higher on almost all components of multiple intelligences compared to South Africans. A comparison of males and females using only the South African sample showed no noted differences in self ratings, except for bodily-kinaesthetic and intrapersonal intelligences. These results are discussed in relation to the literature.en
dc.language.isoen_ZAen
dc.subjectIntelligence levels--South Africa.en
dc.subjectIntelligence levels--Nigeria.en
dc.subjectBlacks--South Africa--Intelligence levels.en
dc.subjectStudents, Black--KwaZulu-Natal.en
dc.subjectTheses--Psychology.en
dc.titleTertiary students' estimates of theirs and their relatives' multiple and overall intelligences : a cross-national study of Nigerian and South African students.en
dc.typeThesisen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record