The attitudes of young male learners towards abortion.

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dc.contributor.advisor Patel, Cynthia.
dc.creator Selebalo, Lebohang M. M.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-03-13T12:06:38Z
dc.date.available 2012-03-13T12:06:38Z
dc.date.created 2010
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10413/5096
dc.description Thesis (M.A.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2010. en
dc.description.abstract Abortion is one of the issues that elicits relatively controversial debates around the globe. These debates revolve around the pro-life and pro-choice stances, moral and religious issues, backstreet abortion, the role of fathers in decision-making and constitutional issues, among others. Therefore, there is a variety of factors that may influence the way individuals perceive abortion. Race, religious affiliation, and religiosity have been found to play a role in determining the attitudes of individuals towards abortion. For instance, racial and religious differences in abortion attitudes among the South African public are reported (Patel, Ramgoon & Paruk, 2009; Rule, 2004). However, research on attitudes towards abortion demonstrates its complex nature and provides somewhat conflicting evidence. Varga (2002) makes the point that while it is important to understand both male and female perspectives on abortion, very little is known about boys‟ attitudes towards abortion, thus the motivation for this research study. Consequently, the aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes of young male learners towards abortion taking into consideration their race, religion and religiosity. Findings indicate that young male learners generally have high religiosity levels and show negative attitudes towards abortion across race and religion. The religious and racial differences in abortion attitudes of male learners were also explored and revealed significant differences amongst the groups, with the Islamic group obtaining the highest levels of abortion opposition for different reasons when compared to Africans and Hindus. In line with past research (Patel & Johns, 2009; Patel & Kooverjee, 2009; Patel & Myeni, 2008), these findings indicate that the higher the religiosity level, the more negative the attitudes towards abortion. en
dc.language.iso en_ZA en
dc.subject Teenage boys--Attitudes. en
dc.subject Abortion--South Africa--Public opinion. en
dc.subject Abortion--South Africa--Psychological aspects. en
dc.subject Abortion--Social aspects--South Africa. en
dc.subject Abortion--Religious aspects. en
dc.subject Abortion--Moral and ethical aspects--South Africa en
dc.subject Theses--Psychology. en
dc.title The attitudes of young male learners towards abortion. en
dc.type Thesis en

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