Safety implications of the introduction of a specially tested assembly into the South African national standard for low-voltage assemblies.

UKZN ResearchSpace

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Ijumba, Nelson M.
dc.creator Bonner, Mark James.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-11-10T09:08:32Z
dc.date.available 2011-11-10T09:08:32Z
dc.date.created 2004
dc.date.issued 2004
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10413/4201
dc.description Thesis (M.Sc.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2004. en
dc.description.abstract Low-voltage switchgear and controlgear assemblies with a rated short-circuit withstand strength above 10 kA, are required, by law, to conform to the South African standard, SANS 1473-1 (Low Voltage Switchgear and Controlgear Assemblies: Part 1: Typetested, partially type-tested and specially tested assemblies with rated short-circuit withstand strength above lOkA). Standard SANS 1473-1 stipulates three categories of assemblies i.e. type-tested, partially type-tested and specially tested assemblies. The specially tested assembly is unique to the South African market, while the other two categories are stipulated in standard SANS IEC 60439-1 (Low Voltage Switchgear and Controlgear Assemblies: Part 1: Type-tested and partially type-tested assemblies), which is internationally accepted in many countries as the applicable low-voltage assembly standard. Standard SANS 1473-1 specifies seven type-tests for certification as a type-tested assembly (TTA), but specifies, at most, three type-tests for certification as a specially tested assembly (STA). The underlying purpose of a technical standard is to provide for the safety of people and property, with the purpose of the research being twofold: 1. To investigate if the testing requirements specified for a specially tested assembly (STA), in accordance with standard SANS 1473-1, are correctly applied, and do not pose any safety risks. 2. To investigate any safety risks that stem from the fact that four type-tests are excluded for verification as a specially tested assembly (STA), as opposed to the seven type tests required for verification as a type-tested assembly (TTA). The document highlights the technical inadequacies of an assembly that is certified as a STA, in accordance with standard SANS 1473-1, and the potential safety risks associated with this type of assembly classification. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Electric switchgear. en
dc.subject Assembly line methods. en
dc.subject Manufacturing processes--Automation. en
dc.subject Manufacturing industries--South Africa. en
dc.subject Manufacturing industries--Quality control. en
dc.subject Theses--Electrical engineering. en
dc.title Safety implications of the introduction of a specially tested assembly into the South African national standard for low-voltage assemblies. en
dc.type Thesis en

Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search UKZN ResearchSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account