Beta-lactamase mediated resistance in Escherichia Coli isolated from state hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal.

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dc.contributor.advisor Essack, Sabiha Y.
dc.contributor.advisor Sturm, A. Willem.
dc.creator Mocktar, Chunderika.
dc.date.accessioned 2011-11-02T09:17:10Z
dc.date.available 2011-11-02T09:17:10Z
dc.date.created 2008
dc.date.issued 2008
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10413/4052
dc.description Thesis (Ph.D.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Westville, 2008. en
dc.description.abstract Escherichia coli, one of the most common pathogens causing urinary tract infections, has shown increased resistance to commonly used antibiotics. In this study we analyzed the β-lactamase profiles of 38 inhibitor-resistant E. coli isolates obtained from public hospitals at three different levels of healthcare in KwaZulu-Natal, selected on the basis of their resistance profiles to the three antibiotic/inhibitor combinations, viz., amoxicillin/clavulanate, ampicillin/ sulbactam and piperacillin/ tazobactam. The isolates were subjected to MIC determinations, IEF analysis, plasmid profile analysis, PCR of the different β-lactamase genes and sequencing thereof to detect the possible mechanism/s of resistance. A range of β-lactamases including two novel inhibitor-resistant TEM β-lactamases, TEM-145 and TEM-146 were detected in two isolates whilst a novel plasmid-mediated AmpC-type β-lactamase, CMY-20 was detected in three isolates. Other β-lactamases included OXA-1, TEM-55, SHV-2, CTX-M-l and TEM-1. Changes were detected in the chromosomal AmpC promoter/attenuator regions in one isolate. Diverse β-lactamase genes and plasmid profiles inferred extensive mobilization of β-lactamase genes causing the concern of limited therapeutic options in the face of increasing resistance. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Escherichia coli. en
dc.subject Theses--Pharmacy and pharmacology. en
dc.subject Beta-lactamases--Escherichia coli. en
dc.title Beta-lactamase mediated resistance in Escherichia Coli isolated from state hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal. en
dc.type Thesis en

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