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dc.contributor.advisorMorrell, Robert Graham.
dc.creatorMkhize, Zimisele Eugene.
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-26T09:00:36Z
dc.date.available2011-09-26T09:00:36Z
dc.date.created1999
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/3674
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Ed.) - University of Natal, Durban, 1999.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the attitudes and perceptions of students who are beaten or physically punished at Amaqadi C.P. School. The response of the school to the South African Schools Act no 27 of 1996 ruling against the exercising of corporal punishment of students is assessed. Observations, interviews, questionnaires and the school record books were the research tools used in this thesis. Most students and teachers favour the continued use of corporal punishment. Even the provincial education minister has shown support for its retention. Various reasons are given by the teachers and students for their support of corporal punishment. Evidence suggests that students are beaten because of the lack of alternative ways of discipline and because corporal punishment is still routinely used in the home. There are many reasons for the retention of corporal punishment in this school but most of these rest on parents, teachers and students.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectCorporal punishment of children--KwaZulu-Natal.en_US
dc.subjectAmaqadi Combined Primary School.en_US
dc.subjectSchool Discipline--Kwazulu Natal.en_US
dc.subjectTheses--Education.en_US
dc.titleThe effects of education policy change on the practice of corporal punishment in a rural school in KwaZulu-Natal : the case of Amaqadi Combined Primary School.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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