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dc.contributor.advisorDayomi, Matthew A.
dc.creatorGumede, Phumlani Ziphozonke Mzamo.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-13T07:38:52Z
dc.date.available2018-12-13T07:38:52Z
dc.date.created2017
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/15928
dc.descriptionMaster of Town and Regional Planning. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2017.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn trying to find alternate renewable energy sources and harnessing methods, the one method that could have mass scale potential within the Warwick transportation precinct is that of integrated active pavements. These are pressure membranes or piezoelectric material that could be integrated into the pavements of high frequency mobility spaces, to harness the mechanical pressure and convert it into electric energy. By formulating a spatial template for transport interchange zones (taxi ranks) within Warwick Junction and along Julius Nyerere Road, by conducting on-site observation studies, focus group interviews with public traders and in-depth interviews with municipal officials and civil society organisations and pedestrian counts along the corridor, we could map out the potential catchment areas for harnessing mechanical energy from pedestrian and vehicular traffic; this would be in accordance with tolerance thresholds of the piezoelectric materials used. Beyond the implementation of such a spatial template within Warwick Junction, we also hope to expand the scope of the municipal renewable energy strategy to include piezoelectric pavements and the mutual existence of public traders. The latter party, public traders, has been marginalized over time whenever development has come upon the Warwick Junction Precinct and therefore, the voices and views of public traders have been largely considered within this research. Even though renewable energy strategies can be simple in process, the conceptualization of integrated development would call upon an urban development strategy that is resilient and is able to maximise the knock-on effects of socio-economic growth, local innovation and carbon emissions reduction. By understanding the spatial function and socio-economic nature of mobility spaces, we can explain how pavements have a dual purpose that could see local off-grid energy-generating systems, making a positive contribution towards local renewable energy generation and in improving spatial efficiency by acknowledging all variables that make up an African City.en_US
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_US
dc.subjectTheses - Town and regional Planning.en_US
dc.subject.otherPiezoelectric pavements.en_US
dc.subject.otherRenewable energy.en_US
dc.subject.otherTransport interchange zone.en_US
dc.subject.otherPrecinct planning.en_US
dc.subject.otherPedestrians.en_US
dc.titleEnergy & Transportation Planning: evaluating an integrated active pavement template for transport interchange zones, as a renewable energy strategy for informal trade - The case study of the Warwick Transportation Precinct located near the eThekwini Central Business District.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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