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dc.contributor.advisorMaharaj, Pranitha.
dc.creatorEdwards, Taygen.
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-27T07:32:28Z
dc.date.available2018-02-27T07:32:28Z
dc.date.created2016
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/15062
dc.descriptionMaster of Art in Population Studies. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 2016.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe persistent socio-economic and demographic inequalities that exist in the South African population have influenced the health-seeking behaviour of various groups, thereby resulting in health outcomes that can be described as being highly inequitable. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of socio-economic and demographic determinants on the health-seeking behaviour of the South African population in an attempt to add to the limited literature on the topic. A quantitative secondary analysis was conducted using the data from the National Income Dynamics Study Wave 4. Multivariate binomial logistic regressions were used to examine the socio-economic and demographic determinants of health-seeking behaviour. Some of the main findings were that women, the elderly and adults who were affiliated with quintile 5 had the highest odds of ever having visited a healthcare facility in the past year; whilst adults who had completed secondary education or resided on farms had the lowest odds. In relation to the type of healthcare facility last visited, adults who had a post-matric qualification belonged to wealth quintile 5 or who were married had the highest odds of going to a private healthcare facility. In contrast, adults who were unemployed who resided in traditional areas and women had the lowest odds of going to a private healthcare facility. The interaction effects investigated highlighted that in post-apartheid South Africa, gender and racial inequalities moderate the influence of selected socio-economic and demographic characteristics on the health-seeking behaviour of the population. Therefore, the present study concludes that both socio-economic and demographic determinants have a significant overall effect on the health-seeking behaviour of the South African population and suggests that future efforts to reduce health inequities should target the structural mechanisms of the social determinants of health.en_US
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_US
dc.subjectTheses - Population Studies.en_US
dc.subject.otherHealth-seeking behaviour.en_US
dc.subject.otherSocio-economic determinants.en_US
dc.subject.otherDemographic factors.en_US
dc.subject.otherSouth Africa.en_US
dc.titleSocio-demographic determinants of health-seeking behaviour among the South African population : an analysis of NIDS.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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