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dc.contributor.advisorSithole, Mpilenhle Pearl.
dc.creatorKhanyile, Khanyisile Nomthandazo.
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-01T09:03:03Z
dc.date.available2012-11-01T09:03:03Z
dc.date.created2011
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/7711
dc.descriptionThesis (M.Soc.Sc.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2011.en
dc.description.abstractFood security exists when the issue of poverty is addressed. Simultaneous access to different forms of capital ensures sustainable livelihoods. On the other hand, food insecurity is interwoven in unemployment and illiteracy, especially amongst adult women. Food insecurity is also deeply rooted in the lack of access to food and non-availability. This compromises the livelihoods within communities The study is concerned with the current state of poverty that remains stagnant, bringing about food insecurity, despite the food security campaigns that have been launched in South Africa. The aim of the study is to establish whether the ‘One Home One Garden’ campaign is unique compared to other campaigns in trying to fight food insecurity. It further inquires about access to the resources necessary to make gardens a sustainable source of livelihood. In order to fulfil these inquiries, qualitative research was undertaken at Nkandla in a section called eQhudeni within two subsections, Nsingabantu and Mjonisini. This research was based on the examination of the impact of the ‘One Home One Garden’ campaign as a poverty alleviation strategy. The study found that poverty, which contributes to food insecurity, has not been addressed by the campaign. Households suffer from chronic food insecurity given the high levels of poverty in the area. ‘The One Home One Garden’ campaign is not sustainable because it does not address the holistic needs of gardening, such as access to organic seeds and water and furthermore it is in any case seasonal. Research obtained showed that people’s perceptions are that the seeds are genetically modified based on the appearance of the produce, and also that they do not reproduce. The study viewed home gardens as a tool capable of addressing food insecurities, but, highlighted that it does not fully address all aspects, rather it upholds that poverty needs to be tackled holistically. In addition, it emphasises that for people to have a sustainable livelihood there should be designated market places from which they can sell their produce.en
dc.language.isoen_ZAen
dc.subjectFood security--KwaZulu-Natal--Nkandla.en
dc.subjectPoverty--KwaZulu-Natal--Nkandla.en
dc.subjectSubsistence farming--KwaZulu-Natal--Nkandla.en
dc.subjectBackyard gardens--KwaZulu-Natal--Nkandla.en
dc.subjectSustainable development--KwaZulu-Natal--Nkandla.en
dc.subjectTheses--Community development.en
dc.subjectKitchen gardens--KwaZulu-Natal--Nkandla.
dc.titleFood security at eQhudeni (Nkandla) : a case study of the 'One home one garden' campaign as a poverty alleviation strategy.en
dc.typeThesisen


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