Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorSienaert, Edgard Richard.
dc.contributor.advisorAllard, Maxime.
dc.creatorFanning, Rosalie Patricia.
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-15T12:49:32Z
dc.date.available2012-10-15T12:49:32Z
dc.date.created1994
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/6922
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)-University of Natal, Durban, 1994.en
dc.description.abstractFor sixty-five years hardly anyone in the English-speaking world was aware of the anthropological theories of Marcel Jousse, a twentieth century Jesuit scholar. In 1990, Jousse's seminal work, Le style oral rythmique et mnemotechnique chez les verbo-moteurs. (The rhythmic and mnemotechnique oral style of the verbo-motors), was translated into English and given the name The Oral Style. His anthropologie du geste, called in this study the anthropology of geste, presented his discovery of the universal anthropological laws governing human expression: mimism, bilateralism and formulism. Jousse had sought to understand the anthropological roots of oral style, in particular the phenomenal memory of oral style peoples. In this dissertation, Jousse's theories are summarised and his anthropological laws are used to determine whether three eucharistic prayers of the Roman rite contain elements of oral style expression. The Roman Canon, Eucharistic Prayer 1 and Eucharistic Prayer for Children 1 are set out in binary and ternary balancings. An attempt is made to show that written style expression, an inheritance from the Greeks, houses in its extraordinary complexity the very oral style elements it appears to have superseded. The assertion made is that written style, with its predilection for subordination, actually conserves, preserves and perpetuates oral style balancings, not only in the simple sentence (what Jousse calls the propositional geste), but also in clauses, phrases, words, and sound devices. Support is given to T. J. Talley's view that the Jewish nodeh lekah (thanksgiving) and not the berakah (blessing) is the prayer source that influenced the structure of the early Christians' eucharist (thanksgiving in Greek). The expressions of thanksgiving that are a distinguishing feature of anaphoras from the 1st century AD onwards, continue to shape the eucharistic prayers today. This is offered as one reason why, in a reconstruction of Eucharistic Prayer for Children 1 presented at the end of Chapter 5, it is possible to balance one recitative with another, and the recitation of one prayer component with another. The dissertation concludes by recommending that oral studies of the Christian liturgies of East and West be pursued as they have much to contribute to the orality-literacy debate not only in the matter of liturgical language but also in gaining an appreciation of other gestes of worship.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCatholic Church--Liturgy.en
dc.subjectGesture.en
dc.subjectMnemonics.en
dc.subjectOral tradition.en
dc.subjectEucharistic prayers--Catholic church.en
dc.subjectJudaism--Prayer-books and devotions.en
dc.subjectJudaism--Liturgy.en
dc.subjectFolk literature--History and criticism.en
dc.subjectLord's supper--Catholic church.en
dc.subjectTheses--Orality-literacy studies.en
dc.subjectLord's supper (Liturgy)en
dc.subjectJousse, Marcel. Oral style.en
dc.titleThe anthropology of geste and the eucharistic rite of the Roman mass.en
dc.typeThesisen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record