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dc.contributor.advisorDalrymple, Lynn I.
dc.contributor.advisorTomaselli, Keyan G.
dc.creatorGumede, Mkhonzeni.eng
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-23T09:24:16Z
dc.date.available2011-03-23T09:24:16Z
dc.date.created2009
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/2653
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2009.en_US
dc.description.abstractGeertz (1994) asserts that man is an animal suspended in webs of significance represented by culture. Culture, education, Christianity, self concept and context are some of the webs of significance that Geertz (1994) refers to. We are always spinning on these webs and sometimes it is difficult to predict responses to new information as we are continuously suspended on these webs. Presented in a narrative framework, using an autoethnographic approach, this is a story about self in relation to the contextual landscape that I continue to interact with which is mediated by family, culture, Christianity, education (academic discipline) and my experience of working for DramAidE. The aim is to understand DramAidE’s practice and investigate ways of improving communication strategies in public health. This story discusses the complex interaction between belief, identity and context in mediating responses to public health communication. Using Act Alive as a case study, I explore how people receive information about HIV/AIDS and how this information is interpreted and applied.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectCommunication and culture--KwaZulu-Natal.en_US
dc.subjectCommunication--Social aspects.en_US
dc.subjectTheses--Culture, communication and media studies.en_US
dc.titleCommunication to societies that hold multiple belief systems : an experience from KwaZulu-Natal.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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