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dc.contributor.advisorBozas, Alexander Robert.
dc.creatorGovender, Ruvania.
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-10T09:33:56Z
dc.date.available2018-11-10T09:33:56Z
dc.date.created2017
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/15834
dc.descriptionMaster of Commerce in Marketing Management. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2017.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe research reveals that although University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN) Westville students are aware of the health implications of excessive fast food consumption, they do not base their purchasing and consumption decisions on the risk factors. It has been found that students base their consumption decisions regularly on convenience. Majority of the registered students at the Westville Campus consume fast food at least two to three times a week whilst a few students do so more than once a day. It has also been determined that the risk factors of excessive fast food consumption do not directly influence the consumption behaviour of these students. Consumers are overwhelmed by numerous advances from marketers with the intention of persuading consumers into making the ultimate consumption decisions for goods or services. This study entails the awareness of UKZN Westville students according to excessive fast food consumption and will analyse such perceptions relating to the independent variables (preferences, factors affecting choice, information, trends and patterns and health implications) and the dependent variable (consumption behavior). According to the statistics from the South African Consumer Satisfaction Index (SAcsi), South African consumers rated fast food outlets with a 79% satisfaction score. However, UKZN Westville students have indicated that hunger (as a mean of satisfaction) does not occur. Moreover, whilst these individuals prefer fast food, the stronger preference is toward home cooked meals. This allows for the understanding of student preferences and the decisions relating to their ultimate consumption of fast food. The core focus provided the analysis of Westville students’ awareness in relation to fast food consumption leading to unhealthy lifestyles. In order to analyse these perceptions, 373 UKZN Westville students aided in administering questionnaires to understand the factors that influence these individuals into making the ultimate purchase. This convenience sampling occurred at the lecture venues, library as well as the main cafeteria in the Westville Campus. This study recommends that future research could be based on mediums such as the Internet due to its popularity, to discover if these aid in influencing consumers consumption decisions of fast food. It is also recommended that researcher be conducted in the wider Durban vicinity to acquire an adequate distribution sample.en_US
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_US
dc.subjectTheses - Marketing Management.en_US
dc.subject.otherConsumption decisions.en_US
dc.subject.otherFood preferences.en_US
dc.subject.otherFast food consumption.en_US
dc.subject.otherLifestyles.en_US
dc.subject.otherHealth risks.en_US
dc.titleFast foods : UKZN Westville students' awareness of the health risks and their consumption patterns.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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