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dc.contributor.advisorPosel, Dorrit.
dc.creatorde Freitas, Micaela.
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-02T06:39:07Z
dc.date.available2017-03-02T06:39:07Z
dc.date.created2016
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/14166
dc.descriptionMasters in Development Studies. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College 2016.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, the practice of design has moved towards human-centred design, and has been applied to a variety of fields, including development. This research provides an evaluation of the implementations and outcomes of human-centred design, using the case study of Warwick Junction in Durban, South Africa. Between 1995 and 2008, the Warwick Junction Urban Renewal Project took place, and using human-centred design introduced design interventions that improved the lives of traders in the area through consultation and participation. However, in 2008, despite the success of this initiative, this approach of human-centred design was abandoned in Warwick Junction. Drawing on available research on human-centred design as well as data collected through independent research and interviews with traders, municipal officials and designers, the implementations and outcomes of the Warwick Project are explored. This study illustrates the factors that are necessary for human-centred design to be implemented in a development context: an environment that encourages change and creative problem-solving; autonomy; observation of the end-users; and a desire to create systemic, sustainable change. With Warwick Junction as a case study, this research identified how humancentred design was used during the Warwick Project through processes such as interdisciplinary teamwork, area-based management, trader consultation and participation, prototyping of design interventions and designers fulfilling the role of facilitators. The findings suggest that if human-centred design is to be used in a development context, participation of the end-users is necessary, human-centred design must be advocated for by all parties involved, and finally, the practice of human-centred design must be continued and incorporated into common practice and policy changes in order for design interventions to be sustained beyond the implementation phase.en_US
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_US
dc.subjectDesign -- Human factors -- South Africa -- Durban.en_US
dc.subjectUrban renewal -- South Africa -- Durban -- Citizen participation.en_US
dc.subjectCommunity development corporations -- South Africa -- Durban.en_US
dc.subjectTheses -- Development studies.en_US
dc.subjectWarwick Junction, Durban.en_US
dc.titleAn evaluation of the implementations and outcomes of human-centred design : a case study of Warwick Junction.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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