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dc.contributor.advisorMaharaj, Pranitha.
dc.creatorNzama, Nolwazi.
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-14T07:24:17Z
dc.date.available2017-02-14T07:24:17Z
dc.date.created2016
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/14055
dc.descriptionMaster of Arts in Population Studies. University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College 2016.en_US
dc.description.abstractWhile South Africa has the lowest fertility rate in Sub Saharan Africa, the observed fertility decline in traditional authority areas is occurring at a slow pace. Poverty and unemployment are amongst the biggest challenges faced by women and young people growing up in traditional authority areas. The key to understanding the level and determinants of childbearing amongst women living in traditional authority areas is to understand the context within which they live. Thus, this study aims to identify the extent of childbearing amongst childbearing aged women between the ages 15-49 living in traditional authority areas. In addition, it examines the factors contributing to the experienced level of childbearing in traditional authority areas. The data used for this study is based on wave three of the National Income Dynamics Study (NIDS) which was conducted in 2010. The methods of analysis that have been used in this study include chi square analysis to identify whether a significant association exists between the dependent variable – ever given birth and the various independent variables. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis is also conducted to investigate the odds of experiencing childbearing for females’ aged 15-49. Based on the results of the bivariate and the multivariate regression model; age, mothers’ occupation, religion, employment status, marital status, and socio-economic status are critical variables affecting women’s reproduction. In traditional authority areas women with only primary level education were found to have higher likelihood odds of childbearing when compared to women with secondary education. Moreover, in rural formal areas, traditional authority areas, urban formal areas and urban informal areas the likelihood odds of fertility seemed to increase with the increase in economic status. Since education, mothers occupation, employment status and socio-economic status have been found to be important in determining fertility; the South African government has a responsibility of developing female traditional authority dwellers with information and skills that would make them employable and, also disseminate vital information that would make women aware of government cash transfers that they may be eligible for. The South African department of education has a responsibility to straighten the quality of education that is offered in rural areas and also to ensure that resources are available for effective learning.en_US
dc.language.isoen_ZAen_US
dc.subjectTheses--Population studies.en_US
dc.subjectFertility--South Africa.en_US
dc.subjectTraditional medicine.en_US
dc.subjectRural health services--South Africa.en_US
dc.subjectFertility, Human.en_US
dc.titleSocio-economic and demographic determinants of fertility in traditional authority areas.en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US


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