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dc.contributor.advisorWest, Gerald Oakley.
dc.creatorBeukes, Rosemary.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-17T08:17:56Z
dc.date.available2014-10-17T08:17:56Z
dc.date.created2014
dc.date.issued2014-10-17
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/11313
dc.description.abstractThe social constructs of “being a man”, often informed by various domains such as culture, religion and even the mass media, have contributed to conflicting views of how men perceive their masculinity and their relationship with women, resulting in many life-denying experiences for women. However, although society and culture play dominating roles in regard to what it means to “be a man”, they do not construct a unified habitus. In other words, although society and culture influence perceptions of maleness, these are not without their contradictions: not all men view their masculinity in the same way and masculinity can and does change. The present research was conducted within an African-feminist framework and demonstrates how 2 Kings 5 offered potential resources for redemptive masculinities, applicable to male and female, both in the Biblical text and in the South African context.en
dc.language.isoen_ZAen
dc.subjectBible. Kings, 2nd.en
dc.subjectMasculinity.en
dc.subjectMen--Religious life.en
dc.subjectTheses--Theology.en
dc.titleA re-reading of 2 Kings 5 : in search of a redemptive masculinity.en
dc.typeThesisen


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