Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorKasiram, Madhubala I.
dc.creatorLiggett, Maria.
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-02T13:20:20Z
dc.date.available2013-12-02T13:20:20Z
dc.date.created2012
dc.date.issued2013-12-02
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10413/10160
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)-University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, 2012.en
dc.description.abstractThe research study described and explored families’ protection of children from sexual abuse as perceived and experienced by families and community leaders in KwaNzimakwe, KwaZulu-Natal. A social construction and ecosystems perspective was utilised in order to understand the effects of perceptions and socio-cultural factors. The tribal area of KwaNzimakwe provided a context for the study to investigate socio-cultural factors that increase vulnerability among children in post apartheid South Africa. Limited empirical data was however found in relation to locally relevant factors pertinent to families’ protection of children from sexual abuse. The perspective of families and the community was ascertained through the use of qualitative methods of data collection. Ten individual interviews were conducted with family members who had past experiences of child sexual abuse and five focus group discussions were carried out with parents and community leaders. The research revealed misconceptions in relation to child sexual abuse with regards to (1) the definition (2) detection (3) awareness of potential risks. Child sexual abuse was found to be a hidden issue as families protect their name and the community perceive it to be a private matter. The study also showed that families do not report cases of child sexual abuse due to mistrust in the child protection system. Other main findings were that insufficiencies in the child protection system and stigma in the community have detrimental effects on families and victims. The absence of men in families and the absence of adults in the lives of children were found to significantly weaken families’ protection of children from sexual abuse. The study attributed this to factors such as poverty, gender roles and perceptions of men. The study recommends further research on the topic and prevention programmes in South Africa with particular reference to strengthening families and community based approaches.en
dc.language.isoen_ZAen
dc.subjectChild sexual abuse--KwaZulu-Natal.en
dc.subjectSexually abused children--KwaZulu-Natal.en
dc.subjectSex crimes--Prevention.en
dc.subjectSexual abuse victims--KwaZulu-Natal.en
dc.subjectTheses--Social work.en
dc.titleFamilies' protection of young children from sexual abuse in Kwanzimakwe.en
dc.typeThesisen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record